How to Make Marshmallows (Paleo)

These Paleo Marshmallows, made with honey and maple syrup, are a surprisingly easy (and impressive) project, and also the very best tasting marshmallows you’re likely to ever eat. Below we offer so many tips on successfully making them, as well as options to flavor them!

Cubes of Paleo MarshmallowsPaleo Marshmallow Recipe

After so many of you successfully made our Homemade Marshmallow Fluff and loved it we knew it was time to get testing to make Paleo Marshmallows! It may seems a little daunting to think about making something like marshmallows, but truly it isn’t that hard. Making these marshmallows is not only a fun activity with impressive results, but seriously they are the BEST marshmallows you’ll ever have tasted–we promise.

What makes this gelatin marshmallow recipe different?

Our recipe is a little different than a lot of marshmallows out there. Aside from being made without any corn syrup and using only unrefined sugars to sweeten the marshmallows, our recipe is different because it includes egg whites, which is a classic French style. The addition of egg whites makes for a fluffier marshmallow that is easier to handle while you are making them. But don’t worry, the egg whites are cooked by the hot sugar syrup to a safe temperature. These fluffy marshmallows are melt-in-your-mouth delicious and are worth the (small) effort to make homemade.

Pouring beef gelatin marshmallows

Here are the Tools You Need for Homemade Marshmallows

Tips for Making Homemade Marshmallows

The first thing you need to know about making marshmallows is that you are making candy! You’ll be cooking up a very hot sugary syrup and then pouring it into beaten egg whites and softened gelatin and whipping them up until the whole mixture has transformed into a glossy stiff peaks. Then you place it in a starch dusted container and let it set before cutting.

  1. The size of the pan you use to make the square marshmallows depends on how big you would like your square marshmallows. For a smaller marshmallow squares use a half sheet pan, or a 9×13 pan. For larger marshmallows use an 8″x8″ or a 9″x9″ pan. Or alternatively you can make cylindrical marshmallows, which will need a sheet pan to hold the piped mixture.
  2. Prep your containers that you will be setting the marshmallows in ahead of time. You want to line them with parchment and vigorously dust with arrowroot or a combination of arrowroot/ powdered sugar. Don’t worry you won’t be eating all of this but it is merely to coat the sticky part of the marshmallow and you shake off any excess starch.
  3. The bowl and whisk attachment of your electric mixer must be cleaned well because if there is any grease in it, it will prevent the egg whites from whipping up properly.
  4. Use a mild flavored honey. A strong flavored honey, or raw honey will shine through more with a honey flavor (of course). We use a mixture of honey and maple syrup so that one flavor isn’t more dominate and the two together works more as a sweetener as opposed to be a flavor component.
  5. The added water in the sugar mixture helps the sugar come to a boil without burning. Put the water in the pot first, then the other two sweeteners. Do not stir the pot. Do not move the pot. You run the risk of crystallizing the sugar, especially because we aren’t using corn syrup.
  6. Make sure you handle the gelatin properly. You’ll want to let it bloom, or hydrate properly as the instructions indicate. The hot sugar syrup acts as the means to melt it so that it can fully incorporate in the marshmallow cream. It will set up after the mixture cools.
  7. You want your sugar mixture to reach the “soft ball” stage or 235ºF-240ºF. This stage gets it’s name from the fact that if you put a droplet of cold water into the boiling sugar, it will turn into a soft ball. This hot sugar mixture is what cooks the egg whites and turns it into marshmallows. If you didn’t have a thermometer you could theoretically test the doneness of the sugar by dropping it in water and watching the reaction, as described above.

Marshmallows made with Gluten free marshmallow recipe

Troubleshooting Tips for Paleo Marshmallows

  1. There are lumps in the bloomed gelatin: It wasn’t bloomed properly. You can try to remove the lumps of the gelatin, or if there are too many you should start over with the gelatin process.
  2. If the egg white mixture hasn’t thickened up: Either the sugar syrup was not the proper temperature, or you haven’t whipped the egg whites long enough, or possibly the bowl had some grease in it. So If it isn’t looking thick and glossy, try whipping longer. And of course use a thermometer to make sure the sweetener has boiled enough! U
  3. The marshmallows are too sticky to work with: Use more starch! Marshmallows are super sticky and you need to coat them in enough starch in order to handle them. You can always dust off the starch after you have finished cutting them, but know that if there isn’t enough starch on them before you go to store them they could end up a sticky mess, so go heavy handed with the starch.
  4. The marshmallows are very wet: The batter was likely under whipped.

Different marshmallow flavors

How to Store Paleo Marshmallows Made with Egg Whites?

Since there are egg whites in this recipes, this marshmallows cannot be stored indefinitely like marshmallows made with only sugar / corn syrup. Before storing, let the cut marshmallows “dry out” for at least 6 hours, or overnight. Store the well dusted marshmallows in an airtight bag / container for up to 1 week at room temperature. We doubt they will last that long anyways! If you find that the marshmallows have started to let out some moisture (which can happen naturally with homemade marshmallows, or sometimes the cause is under whipping the batter) take the marshmallows out of the bag and sift again with arrowroot and powdered sugar mixture and let dry before placing in another clean, dry container.

Options for Flavored Marshmallows

The possibilities are endless as to what you can add to the marshmallow cream mixture before you set, or even what you coat the marshmallows in at the end to flavor them. We tried out a few different add-in’s to flavor the marshmallows. Choose your add-in and fold them after the egg whites have thickened up. You can also divide the marshmallow mixture and make multiple flavors with one batch of marshmallows. You have to work quickly though because ones the marshmallow cream cools down it will set.

  • Freeze Dried Fruit: We tried strawberries but bet any freeze dried fruit will work well here. Start with 1/4 cup crushed freeze dried fruit.
  • Matcha Powder: About 1-2 tablespoons
  • Espresso Powder: Start with a teaspoon and add more if needed
  • Cinnamon: Start with 2 teaspoons and add more if needed)
  • Cocoa: Add about 1-2 tablespoons
  • Dried Ginger or Turmeric: Start with a 2 teaspoons for a batch
  • Mint Extract (a few drops) and Chocolate Chips

Instead of coating with arrowroot, try coating with:

  • Shredded Coconut
  • Crushed Nuts
  • Cocoa

Paleo marshmallows getting toasted

If you like this HOW TO recipe, check out these others:

How to Make Marshmallows

Prep Time 00:15 Cook Time 00:10 Inactive Time 04:00 Total Time 04:25 Yields Large batch

Ingredients

Directions

  1. To make square marshmallows: prepare a container for the marshmallows (see note). Lightly spray the container and then line it with two strips of parchment that fit the container to create a sling. Generously dust the container with arrowroot (or combo arrowroot and powdered sugar). Alternatively, to make traditional cylindrical marshmallows: line a sheet tray with parchment and generously dust with arrowroot. Set aside.
  2. In a clean mixing bowl for an electric mixer with a whisk attachment, add egg whites.
  3. In a large pot add ⅓ cup water, honey and maple syrup, in that order, being careful not to get any of the mixture on the sides of the pot. Turn the heat to medium and let the sugar mixture cook undisturbed.
  4. Meanwhile prepare gelatin: Add ½ cup water to a small bowl. Sprinkle gelatin over the water and mix to moisten the gelatin. Let bloom (or hydrate) for at least 5 minutes. Once bloomed, add to the egg white mixture and briefly whip until the mixture is homogenized and fluffy, about 2 minutes.
  5. When the the sugar syrup has reached 240°F, remove from the heat and let cool slightly, or until it has stopped bubbling, about 1 minute.
  6. Then very slowly and carefully pour the sugar syrup into the egg whites bowl, hitting the side of the bowl if possible, in a thin, steady stream.
  7. Once all of the syrup is in, increase the speed and continue to whip for 10-12 minutes, or until the mixture is thick and glossy and the mixing bowl is mostly cooled.
  8. Add in vanilla extract and whip for one one more minute. If you are adding in any optional add-ins, add them now.
  9. For square marshmallows: Working quickly pour mixture into the prepared container and smooth over. Dust generously with more arrowroot and let set for at least 4 hours until cutting. To cut remove from the container and cut with a pizza cutter that is greased with coconut oil. Dust again all the cut sides with more arrowroot, shaking off excess. For cylindrical marshmallows: Fill a piping bag with a large circular tip (or simply cut a piping bag) with the marshmallow mixture and pipe it in lines the length of the sheet tray until all the mixture is gone. Dust generously with arrowroot. Let set for 4 hours at room temperature. Cut with a pizza cutter that is greased with coconut oil into cyridrical shapes. Dust more with arrowroot, shaking off the excess before storing.
  10. Let the cut marshmallows dry out for at least 6 hours before storing in an air tight container or bag. Store for up to 1 week.

Recipe Notes

  1. The size of the pan you use to make the square marshmallows depends on how big you would like your square marshmallows. For a smaller marshmallow squares use a half sheet pan, or a 9x13 pan. For larger marshmallows use an 8"x8" or a 9"x9" pan.
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There may be affiliate links in this post! By clicking on them, or purchasing recommended items I may receive a small compensation, at no cost to you! However, I only recommend products I absolutely love and use in my own home! Thank you for supporting Lexi's Clean Kitchen when you shop! See my privacy policy for more information about this, the information we save, and more!

How to Naturally Dye Easter Eggs Using Food

There are so many options out there for natural Easter egg dye using ingredients you have already in your kitchen and we’re showing you some of the options we loved with tips, tricks, and more!

Naturally Dyed Easter eggs in cartonNatural Easter Egg Dye

Did you know that it is so easy to naturally dye Easter eggs with food ingredients you likely already have in your pantry? It will be no surprise if you’ve been on this website for a while that we love to switch out artificial colors and unnecessary chemical additions to foods as much as we can, like these Naturally Colored Buttercream and these plant based decorated Sugar Cookies. If we wouldn’t eat a product with a long list of ingredients we can’t recognize why would we add chemicals in the form of artificial dyes to the food we make at home?

Some might say that you are just dyeing the outside of the egg: but anybody who has ever colored eggs know more often than not that color seeps in through the shell and colors the egg. So making festive colored eggs with actual FOOD coloring is a no-brainer. And honestly, it’s so simple and so FUN to experiment. You can create unique looking eggs that even will change color over time, the longer they sit. Kids and adults alike will find this holiday craft turned science experiment so fun!

Results of natural Easter egg dye recipe

How to Dye Easter Eggs Naturally

Take a look in your pantry! We used white eggs, but you can experiment with brown eggs as they will have a different effect. All the eggs you see in these photos were dyed with these four foods:

  • Beets (red/pink/brown): 1 large beet, diced + 2 cups water
  • Red Cabbage (blue): 1/2 red cabbage, sliced + 2 cups water
  • Red Onion Skins (deep orange/brown): Skins from 4 large onions + 2 cups water
  • Fresh or Dried Turmeric (yellow): 1/4 cup sliced fresh turmeric or 2 tablespoons dried + 2 cups water

Other natural color suggestions:

  • Blueberries (grey/blue): 2 cups frozen blueberries + 2 cups water (don’t boil this, just let it steep)
  • Carrots (orange/yellow): 3 large carrots, sliced + 2 cups water
  • Spinach or Parsley (green): 2 cups spinach or 1 bunch parsley + 2 cups water
  • Yellow Onion Skins (orange): Skins from 4 large onions + 2 cups water
  • Coffee (brown): 2 cups strong brewed coffee

Natural Easter egg dyes in jarsHere is what you need to know to naturally dye eggs:

  1. Make the boiled eggs. We recommend using the water boiling or steaming method. Check out this post here. We normally love the Instant Pot for steaming eggs, but not here. We don’t recommend using the Instant Pot for colored eggs because they are more likely to crack in the food coloring. Let the eggs cool completely before coloring.
  2. Bring the food item in 2 cups of water up to a boil, cover and let simmer for 20 minutes. Strain and let cool. Once cool add 2 teaspoons of vinegar.
  3. Gently drop the white eggs in the color. They must be completely submerged.
  4. The longer the eggs sit in the color, the more brilliant the color will be. Letting the eggs soak overnight yielded the best color for us.
  5. When you are ready to take the eggs out of the color, place a clean kitchen towel down and gently pull out the eggs and place on the towel, or you could place them on a wire rack to prevent and the towel from wiping off any of the color. Let it air dry, do not rub it. If you’d like to dip the egg again to get a darker hue do that once it has dried. In addition, if you want to combine colors to make different hues (think coloring an egg first yellow, then blue=green) now is the time to do it.
  6. Once completely dry you can gently rub it with oil to help prevent the color from changing. We found that some of the eggs changed colors over a few days time (especially the beet one). Do them the day before Easter if you’d like them to be as close to the color as you want as possible.

Eggs dyed with natural egg dyeHow to Make Green Naturally Dyed Eggs:

To make green we first dyed the egg with turmeric (yellow) and then dyed it with red cabbage (blue) to make the egg green!

Do you have to use vinegar to dye eggs?

Yes! Without going into all the science behind it, the short answer is that the added acid from the white vinegar brings it to the correct pH level needed for the dye to adhere to the egg shell. The approximate amount of vinegar needed is about 1 teaspoon per 1 cup of dye. We experimented by adding more vinegar to some of our dyes and we got a cool spotted effect.

How to Make Different Effects on Naturally Dyed Easter Eggs

  1. Add more vinegar: When we added more vinegar to the dye it created a bubbly effect which created the dots you see on our eggs.
  2. Dip for different lengths of time: You can try dipping the eggs for shorter periods of time. For our pink spotted eggs seen above we just briefly dipped the eggs in the beets for like 10 seconds and then let it dry.
  3. Double dipping eggs, depending on the different colors can create different effects. Honestly we had different results each time, so have fun experimenting.
  4. To create an ombre effect you can start dying a batch of eggs, and then every few hours take one of the eggs out of the dye.

Should eggs be cold or at room temperature for coloring?

You want both the boiled eggs and the natural dye to be cool during the dye process, so that not only do the eggs not overcook in the natural dye, but also for safety. Leave the eggs in the dye in the refrigerator overnight.

Natural Easter egg coloring

Don’t want to make your own dye but want to try naturally coloring eggs?

There are also a few different products on the market. Try these good brands:

Tools we used in this recipe:


Lastly, check out these other healthier Easter recipes:

How to Naturally Dye Easter Eggs
How to Naturally Dye Easter Eggs With Food

How to Make Body Scrub (& Why You Should Exfoliate!)

We’re deep diving into How to Make Body Scrub and giving you a few options so you can customize your DIY sugar scrub or salt scrub just how you want it! These DIY exfoliating body scrubs take ingredients you likely already have in your kitchen and turns them into a delicious scented scrub that leaves your skin moisturized and smooth, while saving you tons of money by making it at home!

Homemade Body ScrubHow to Make Body Scrub

The LCK team has been using these DIY scrub for a few weeks now and have been loving it. Not only does it smell AMAZING, but it leaves your skin feeling rejuvinated and moisturized.

We love a good deep exfoliation, especially as spring is around the corner and the winter skin is coming in strong! We were in love with our Chocolate Coconut Body Scrub during the holiday season, so we wanted to expand! Making a body scrub at home is so simple and we’re going to give you the details on how to make body scrub using all natural ingredients, many of which can be found inside your pantry right now. You can customize them based off of your skin needs and use up to a few times a week!

Why is it important to exfoliate your skin

A sugar scrub or salt scrub, also known as an exfoliator, is a purchased or homemade product that helps the skin rid the body of dead skin cells that then reveals healthy, glowing skin. While our body naturally sheds dead skin cells, as we age this process slows down and the dead skin can get backed up causing pores to get clogged, and making skin dry, rough, dull and spotty.

What are the benefits of exfoliating

  • Helps remove dead skin cells.
  • Your other products will work better since exfoliating your face eliminates the dead skin on top, it lets your cleanser, moisturizer and other products penetrate more deeply and work better.
  • Can increase blood circulation (which helps you to achieve healthy and glowing skin)
  • Unclog pores from dirt, blackheads, and other surface impurities so that new, healthy skin may flourish!
  • Exfoliating helps skin turn over its top dermal layer more often, so you can address a multitude of problems such as dryness and flakiness.

homemade body scrub for glowing skin

Who benefits from exfoliation?

All skin types can benefit from a body scrub. Your skin type will depend on how often you use it. People with normal/dry skin might use an exfoliator 2-3 times a week, while people with more sensitive skin might use it just once a week. We don’t recommend using this at all on your face. This recipe for body scrub is intended for the body only (as the name suggests!)

Ingredients in a Body Scrub

A lot of commercially produce scrubs and exfoliators include common household ingredients like salt and sugar and oatmeal, but also contain a lot of other ingredients that may or may not be safe for your body. If you already own a body scrub, or have used one in the past you can check it’s safety from this website here. We love the idea of using household ingredients that can exfoliate and moisturize your skin naturally. Plus it’s so much more economical!

Homemade Body Scrub

DIY Body Scrub

Start with a base ingredient, or the main exfoliant, and then add in your oil, followed by a few fun add-in options!

Base:

You can choose between sugar or salt. There are options below for how vigorous you want the exfoliation process to be.

  • Brown Sugar: This is a a very soft exfoliant and as a bonus adds moisture.
  • Coconut Sugar: This is a larger grain of sugar and is a rougher moisturizer. If using this, depending on your add-in you may need to use a bit more of the carrier oil (see below).
  • Kosher Salt, or other large crystal of salt: This is a rougher exfoliator, and is particularly good with lemon.
  • Pink Himalayan Sea Salt: This is the salt we keep around for cooking. It is a finer salt, so a more gentle exfoliant while also having the added benefit of the minerals it naturally contains.

Oils:

These oils or carrier oils help the body scrub apply smoothly and helps moisturize the skin. You can use one of these or do a combination.

  • Almond Oil: This is high in Vitamin E, can protect your skin from harmful UV radiation, and easily penetrates the skin which can help clean out your pores.
  • Jojoba Oil: This oil is similar to the oil naturally found on your skin. It absorbs fairly quickly.
  • Coconut Oil: This oil is an amazing moisturizer and has natural antibacterial properties.
  • Avocado Oil: This is high in Vitamins A, D, and E and can help sooth inflammation.
  • Olive Oil: Commonly found in our kitchens! It is heavier and absorbs slower on the skin. Be sure to use the best possible olive oil you can find (pure/cold pressed/organic).

Add-ins:

Some of these have specific benefits for your skin while others simply add a pleasant scent that can help brighten your day.

  • Essential Oils (we like lavender, lemongrass, tea tree, lemon and peppermint but feel free to experiment)
  • Finely Ground Coffee (the caffeine and antioxidants are said to be good for your skin)
  • Lemon, Orange, or Lime Zest (this adds a bright scent!)
  • Ground Oatmeal (this is an added exfoliant, plus it soothes the skin)
  • Honey (this is a natural cleanser!)
  • Lemon Juice (a natural astringent, be careful using this with very sensitive skin)
  • Herbs & Spices (suck as thyme, rosemary or cinnamon)
  • Cocoa Powder (this is high in antioxidants)
  • Vitamin E Oil (is said to have anti-aging properties)
  • Aloe Vera (is said to be good on acne prone and dry skin and has anti-inflammatory properties)
  • Argan Oil (is a great moisturizer and can help with acne)
  • Castille Soup (add this if you want your scrub to also double as a cleanser, we like Dr. Bronner’s)

DIY body scrub

How to use a body scrub

How to use them: Soften your skinin a warm shower for a few minutes, cleanse your body if desired, and then grab a dollop of the body scrub and gently scrub in a circular motion on clean, rough skin. Rinse completely. Moisturize afterwards! We recommend about once a week, but you can go up to 2-3 times a week to tackle really dry and rough skin.

Can you over exfoliate your skin

Yes, and some skin is more sensitive than others. Aggressive exfoliation can lead to irritated and red skin. We recommend exfoliating 1-3 times a week!

How to Make Body Scrub

Prep Time 00:05 Total Time 00:05

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sugar or salt
  • ½ cup oil 
  • Add-ins (use 6-12 drops of essential oils if using, or about 2 teaspoons other add-ins)

Directions

  • In a medium combine all ingredients and mix with a spoon until fully combined.
  • Place gently (do not pack it down) in a jar with a tight fitting lid and use weekly or every few days on body.

Recipe Notes

  1. You can tweak your body scrub depending on how you you want it to feel and smell. 
  2. Don't bring glassware into the shower. A reader wrote to us and shared a story of bring a glass jar in the shower and accidentally dropping it and cutting herself. So we wanted to spell this out that for safety reasons if you are using a glass jar keep it out of the shower. Or use a plastic container.
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There may be affiliate links in this post! By clicking on them, or purchasing recommended items I may receive a small compensation, at no cost to you! However, I only recommend products I absolutely love and use in my own home! Thank you for supporting Lexi's Clean Kitchen when you shop! See my privacy policy for more information about this, the information we save, and more!

Want to make body scrubs as a gift?

Grab our free printable labels:

  • Grab any jar you like (these are fun!)
  • We buy these labels!
  • Click here for the page of labels where you can hand write in what type you made!

Corned Beef Brine Recipe (Nitrate Free!)

Corned Beef is more often purchased already brined than it is made at home, but using this easy Corned Beef Brine Recipe it’s so simple to DIY using our pickling spice mixture and beef brisket. We are skipping the nitrates and using whole ingredients you recognize and the best part is the taste of the final product is far superior than anything store-bought and is SO FUN to accomplish!

Brine brisket for corned beefCorned Beef Brine Recipe

Did you know that you could make your own corned beef at home, starting totally from scratch? It’s so easy when you use this Corned Beef Brine Recipe, we promise! And honestly it results in the best tasting corned beef that is so incredibly flavorful–and you control what goes it in instead of putting in some strange spice package of unknown ingredients. Plus it’s one of those cool things to be able to say that you know how to brine your own brisket, right?

What exactly is corned beef?

Let’s start here, because some of you may have some questions! Corned beef is really just beef that has been preserved with salt, also known as brining. It’s flavored with the salt, spices and a bit of a sweetener which essentially means that you are pickling it, so think of it like pickled beef! The name corned beef comes from an old English way of referring to large granules of salt as “corns”, and therefor it just means salted beef, and there is not actually corn involved.

Most commercially prepared corned beef contains saltpeter, also known as sodium nitrate. The sodium nitrate is a curing salt that contributes to the pink color and cured flavor of corned beef. It also prevent the meat from spoiling or going rancid while it is curing. However, since the meat is cooked after it is brined it is not essential to use it. The use of nitrates and nitrites are controversial as to whether or not they are harmful in cured meats because cured meats typically contain such a small amount, and on average a person consumes larger amounts of naturally occurring sodium nitrates in vegetables like spinach, beets, celery and others. But in 2010 nitrates were declared a possible carcinogen by the World Health Organization, so when possible we avoid buying meat with added nitrates. So for this recipe we skip the sodium nitrate all together since it is not needed, and instead used beet root powder to color the meat, though this is optional.

How to brine corned beef

Why do we eat corned beef?

Corned beef is popularly cooked during the American celebration of all things Irish on St. Patrick’s Day. It can be called a corned beef dinner or a boiled dinner, which refers to the fact that corned beef is often slowly boiled with some vegetables. But if you dig a little deeper, our American tradition of corned beef actually has little to do with food that you might find in Ireland, and more to do with the corned brisket you would have found in a kosher Jewish deli at the turn of the century. Corned beef can also be thinly sliced and use in sandwiches such as pastrami, or then remade into several different recipes, like corned beef hash.

What is the best cut of meat for corned beef?

For this recipe we’re using a flat cut brisket! That cut of meat is ideal because it is contains a lot of fat (which equals flavor) and is generally tough, so the brining really helps transform it. You can also make corned beef from an eye round roast.

What is in the corned beef spice packet?

Honestly, anything can be in those spice packets that sometimes come with commercially produced corned beef. Which is why we advocate making your own (or buying a high quality one). For our corned beef pickling spice we use:

  • juniper berries
  • cinnamon
  • whole cloves
  • peppercorn
  • bay leaves
  • mustard seed

Corned beef brine

How long do you brine corned beef?

Traditionally brined corned beef with sodium nitrates can be brined for as long as 10 days. Because we were skipping it, we went with a smaller amount of time brining, about 5-6 days as there is enough salt in the brine to transform the meat in a shorter amount of days.

Why do you rinse corned beef?

This step is important! If the meat has been properly brined it has been infused with not only the flavor, but also the salt. Before you cook the meat you want to rinse it with cool water to remove all the excess salt. Similarly, you want to cook the corned beef in a ton of water to help bring out some of the salt. Don’t worry though ALL of the flavor of the spices is inside of the meat, and a properly brined beef doesn’t need additional spices during cooking because it’s infused inside of it.

best corned beef recipe

How do you cook corned beef?

Traditionally corned beef is brought to a boil on the stove top and simmered for a few hours. Vegetables like cabbage, potato and carrots are added into the pot and they’re boiled in the flavorful stock until just tender. Another method of cooking it would be in the slow cooker on low for 6-8 hours, depending on the size of the beef, and similarly vegetables added in. We’re talking all about how to cook it in the Instant Pot, which is our modern favorite way of cooking it over here in this post.

For this recipe, we used these tools:

  • Large pot
  • Plastic bag with a tight seal
  • Large container to hold curing beef

If you like this DIY recipe, check out these others:

Corned Beef Brisket Brine Recipe

Prep Time 00:10 Total Time 0:10 Serves 4-6

Ingredients

  • 2 quarts water (preferably distilled / filtered)
  • ½ cup coconut sugar
  • 1 cup kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon mixed peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon juniper berries
  • 1 teaspoon whole cloves
  • 1 teaspoon whole allspice
  • 3 dried or fresh bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon beet root powder (optional, see note)
  • 3-4 lb. flat cut beef brisket

Directions

  1. In a large pot add all of the ingredients, except the beet root powder (if using), and bring to a boil. After all of the salt and sugar has dissolved shut off the heat.
  2. Let the mixture cool completely. You can let this happen naturally, or you can place the brine in an ice bath by placing the brine inside of a clean bowl and then placing that bowl inside of another bowl filled with ice water.
  3. Once the brine is cool place the beet root powder (if using) and brisket inside a 2 gallon plastic bag and place the bag inside of a large container that will catch any accidental drips. This container has to be able to fit inside of your refrigerator.
  4. Carefully pour all of the brine inside of the plastic bag and seal it. Lay the plastic bag flat inside of the container and place in your refrigerator for 5-6 days.
  5. Each day carefully turn the bag upside down to stir the brine and make sure all of the beef is submerged.
  6. Once ready to cook discard the brine and the spices and rinse the corned beef thoroughly.
  7. See this post for cooking instructions.

Recipe Notes

  1. Traditionally corned beef is cured using a salt that turns the brisket pink. We are purposefully skipping this salt, also known as sodium nitrate because it's been labeled a possible carcinogen and is not necessary in this recipe. Without the sodium nitrate the corned beef is rather gray. We experimented with adding beet root powder to help counteract that and found that the resulting corned beef wasn't super pink, but it did change the color a bit. This is totally optional, and might not be worth buying a package of beet root powder just for this purpose if you are never going to use it again.
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There may be affiliate links in this post! By clicking on them, or purchasing recommended items I may receive a small compensation, at no cost to you! However, I only recommend products I absolutely love and use in my own home! Thank you for supporting Lexi's Clean Kitchen when you shop! See my privacy policy for more information about this, the information we save, and more!

DIY Pumpkin Pie Spice

Pumpkin Pie Spice is ubiquitous come the fall, and we’re not sad about it! Especially because it’s so easy to make your own DIY Pumpkin Spice Blend and you get to control the quality of spices (and quantities) that are added to it!  Plus, you’ll likely already have what you need on hand at home in your spice cabinet so you can make it right now!
What can i substitute for pumpkin pie spice

DIY Pumpkin Pie Spice

I’m all about my pumpkin pie spice in the fall! There are so many great recipes, including so many on this site, that include this spice blend and it’s so simple to make your own DIY Pumpkin Pie Spice instead of purchasing a separate blend when you likely already have the ingredients in your spice cabinet!

The best part about making your own spice blend is that you can control the quality and quantity. When you are purchasing a bottle of it at the store there is always a chance you actually don’t like the taste because that brand may have more or less of the particular blend of spices they are using, and this has definitely happened to me before. If you happen to like one of those spices more than the other in our blend, you can increase or decrease the quantity by a little (start with 1/2 a teaspoon at a time) to suit your taste.

This DIY Pumpkin Spice Blend also makes a great gift! Place it in a cute jar, with a ribbon and homemade label and bring along as a hostess gift!

 

DIY Pumpkin Pie Spice

 

What spices are in pumpkin spice?

Our blend includes cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and cloves! This matches the most common blend of spices you will find in the store! Once made store in a jar with a tight fitting lid for up to a year. After a year spices start to lose their potency, though they are still “safe” to consume.

Let’s talk about ALL THE WAYS to use this spice blend:

 

DIY Pumpkin Pie Spice

Like this DIY recipe? Check out these others:

Watch the video:

 

 

DIY Pumpkin Pie Spice

Total Time 0:00

Ingredients

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in a jar
  • Store in spice cabinet
  • Loading nutrition data...
    There may be affiliate links in this post! By clicking on them, or purchasing recommended items I may receive a small compensation, at no cost to you! However, I only recommend products I absolutely love and use in my own home! Thank you for supporting Lexi's Clean Kitchen when you shop! See my privacy policy for more information about this, the information we save, and more!

    DIY Best Ever Chicken Rub

    This DIY Best Ever Chicken Rub is the perfect gift to throw together for the griller in your family! Make a small or large batch, place the mix in a cute jar, and add it to a basket with BBQ tools for an awesome holiday gift this season! 

    DIY Best Ever Chicken Rub

    DIY Gift Week Day 2!

    Yesterday I shared the Espresso Candied Pecans, and today is the Best Ever Grilled Chicken rub from my cookbook! It is a staple. In fact, it’s the only grilled chicken I make! It’s flavorful and delicious. You can easily make a big batch and send it along with some grilling gear to the grill master in the family. I know I’d like that gift! 

    DIY Best Ever Chicken Rub

    Throw together a little basket with the spice mix, these grilling tools, and maybe even a gift card to the local market or his/her favorite butcher! 

    What You’ll Need:

    Mini Jars (any will do- adjust sizes based on quantity you are giving)

    Printable Labels (these have all the info filled in for your grilling gift)

    BBQ Tools (these would make a great gift!)

    Ribbon

    Card Stock (White) Card Stock (Brown)


    DIY Best Ever Chicken Rub

    Best Ever Grilled Chicken Rub
    Serves 6
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    Prep Time
    5 min
    Prep Time
    5 min
    Ingredients
    1. 1 tablespoon Italian Seasoning
    2. 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
    3. ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    4. ½ teaspoon onion powder
    5. ½ teaspoon turmeric powder
    6. Optional: ¼ to ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes, as desired
    Instructions
    1. Place all spices into your jar.
    When cooking, add
    1. 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    2. 2 cloves garlic, minced
    Makes
    1. About ¼ cup wet rub [enough for 1 to 1½ pounds boneless chicken
    Lexi's Clean Kitchen https://lexiscleankitchen.com/

     


     

    DIY Best Ever Chicken RubDownload your printable spice rub labels HERE.

    Best Ever Grilled Chicken Rub

    Prep Time 5 min Total Time 0:05

    Ingredients

    Directions

  • Place all spices into your jar.
  • Recipe Notes

    1. 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    2. 2 cloves garlic, minced
    3. About ¼ cup wet rub [enough for 1 to 1½ pounds boneless chicken
    Loading nutrition data...
    There may be affiliate links in this post! By clicking on them, or purchasing recommended items I may receive a small compensation, at no cost to you! However, I only recommend products I absolutely love and use in my own home! Thank you for supporting Lexi's Clean Kitchen when you shop! See my privacy policy for more information about this, the information we save, and more!