Pistachio Mint Pesto

This bright Pistachio Mint Pesto is a unique twist on the classic to use up all of that abundant summer mint! It’s made with pistachio, mint and dill and is so bright and refreshing. It’s perfect for grilled meat or veggies and comes together quickly to add a nice punch of flavor to any dish!

Fresh Mint Pesto Recipe

A well made pesto is like a flavor bomb. Adding this Mint Pesto to any dish will brighten it and elevate the flavor! This nuanced pesto is made with fresh mint leaves, dill, green onions, pistachios and lemon! The truth is you can make pesto out of just about anything, and while most people think of pesto with basil, this mint pesto is just as delicious. You can pair it with nearly anything, but it’s great with grilled meats, veggies, chicken and as a spread on a cheese board.

Ingredients for Pistachio Mint Pesto

  • Pistachios 
  • Fresh Mint Leaves
  • Dill sprigs
  • Green Onions
  • Olive Oil
  • Lemon Juice
  • Lemon Zest
  • Salt and Pepper

How to Wash Fresh Mint

Mint can often be very gritty and dirty. To properly wash mint you should:

  1. Pick all the mint leaves off the stem
  2. Fill a big bowl with cool water
  3. Submerge the mint leaves and swoosh them around.
  4. Let them sit for a minute so that the dirt drops to the bottom.
  5. Pick up the mint leaves as gently as possible, so as to not disturb the dirt, and place in a colander.
  6. Empty out the water, rinse the bowl and repeat the process until no dirt is left behind in the bowl.
  7. If desired you can run the mint leaves in a salad spinner to dry them off.

How to Prevent Pesto from Turning Brown

Pesto turns brown when the fresh herbs oxidize by coming into prolonged contact with oxygen. It isn’t harmful to eat brown pesto, but it can have an off taste and it looks unpleasant. To prevent browning you can float some olive oil over the top of pesto in the container. Make sure to cover the pesto entirely. This creates an airtight seal and will prevent the pesto from turning brown immediately.

pesto made with mint in a blenderWays to Use Pistachio Mint Pesto

This bright pesto would be great with so many dishes! It is great with chicken, turkey or even pork. This would be a nice addition with lamb in springtime as well! You can use pesto in pasta dishes, rice dishes, in a salad, as a dip or spread and served over a grilled meat or veggies.

Check out these recipes that use pesto:

If you like this mint recipe, check out these others:

Pistachio Mint Pesto

Prep Time 00:05 Total Time 00:05 Yields 1-1/2 cups

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup whole raw pistachios 
  • 2 cups packed mint leaves, washed well
  • ½ cup packed dill
  • 2 green onions, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • Big pinch salt
  • Pinch of ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • Hot water, if needed

Directions

  1. Add all of the ingredients except the olive oil to a food processor or a high speed blender. Pulse until finely chopped.
  2. With the motor running, drizzle in the olive oil. If needed you can add in a tablespoon of hot water as needed to make a smooth pesto. Taste and adjust seasoning.
  3. Use immediately or store for up to 1 week in a tightly sealed container.

Recipe Notes

  1. If storing for more than a day, to prevent browning float some olive oil over the top of the pesto to create an airtight seal.
Loading nutrition data...
There may be affiliate links in this post! By clicking on them, or purchasing recommended items I may receive a small compensation, at no cost to you! However, I only recommend products I absolutely love and use in my own home! Thank you for supporting Lexi's Clean Kitchen when you shop! See my privacy policy for more information about this, the information we save, and more!

Easy Cucumber Salad with Lots of Herbs!

When your garden is overrun with cucumbers this summer, this is the salad to make! Or, when you just are really in need of a refreshing, flavor-packed, and super simple salad to throw together. This Easy Cucumber Salad with Herbs uses all of the fresh herbs (parsley, dill, and mint) and features the fresh, cool cumber to complement any dish you’re serving up this summer

bowl of easy cucumber saladEasy Cucumber Salad Recipe

This recipe is for when you have found yourself googling: “How do you use a lot of cucumbers?” this summer. Throwing together this Easy Cucumber Salad with ALL THE HERBS is just the answer! This recipe is light, refreshing and a great side salad to accompany all of your grilling mains, seafood or chicken dishes this summer! And it’s a great way to use up all those fresh herbs you have too!

This recipe works with either farm fresh large cucumbers you find in the summer, or if you’re craving a refreshing side it can also work with store-bought English hot house cucumbers. If you are using extra large cucumbers from your garden or the farm feel free to scoop out the seeds and slice in half moon shapes.

bowl of cucumber salad and herbsHere’s what’s in it:

  • 2 large cucumbers, thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • lemon juice
  • dijon mustard
  • dill
  • parsley
  • mint
  • salt and pepper
  • garlic powder
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes

a plate full of what goes with cucumber salad

What goes with cucumber salad?

To begin, the best thing about this cucumber salad is that it is oh-so-versatile! It can go with just about anything! It’s great to serve as a side for a barbecue, alongside seafood or just about any chicken dish. Here are some of our favorites that go great with this clean cucumber salad:

Looking for more summer sides recipes, check these out:

Herb Cucumber Salad
Serves 4
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
20 min
Prep Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 large cucumbers, thinly sliced
  2. 3 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  3. 1/2 lemon, juiced
  4. 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  5. 1 teaspoon dijon mustard
  6. 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
  7. 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  8. 1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint
  9. 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  10. 1/4 teaspoon garlic granules
  11. Pinch of red pepper flakes
Instructions
  1. Slice cucumbers using a knife or a mandolin. Place in a bowl and sprinkle with sea salt.
  2. In a bowl combine oil, vinegar, dijon, fresh herbs, salt, garlic, and red pepper flakes.
  3. Pour mixture over cucumbers and toss to coat evenly. Let sit for 10 minutes.
  4. Serve immediately.
Lexi's Clean Kitchen https://lexiscleankitchen.com/

How to Preserve Fresh Herbs in the Freezer

Whether you have a bunch of fresh herbs from the farmer’s market, your garden or the grocery store, we are sharing tips on how to preserve them in the freezer for use any time of the year! If you are looking for how to store fresh herbs in your refrigerator, see this post.

Showing how to preserve fresh herbsPreserving Fresh Herbs in Your Freezer

Using fresh herbs is a great way to brighten any dish and bring it from just ok to really delicious! But sometimes a little goes a long way with fresh herbs and you can be left with an entire bunch leftover from one recipe. Or you have an overabundance of herbs from your summer CSA or your backyard garden and want to preserve the freshness all year long. Fear not there are TONS of ways you can preserve fresh herbs so you don’t have to waste any. We’re telling you all about the ways we’ve been successful preserving fresh herbs in the freezer. If you are looking for ways to store herbs fresh in the refrigerator, check out this post here.

There isn’t one hard and fast rule about preserving herbs, so we’re going to walk you through all of our favorite ways to store each particular herb that is good to freeze!

Can you freeze fresh herbs?

Absolutely yes. We’re talking about three main ways to store fresh herbs in the freezer for preservation today.

  1. Storing whole herbs in the freezer.
  2. Storing herbs submerged in water, stock or oil in the freezer in ice cube trays or jars.
  3. Storing pureed herbs in the freezer.

Not all herbs are equally freeze well, though. Depending on the type of herb will determine how it is best to freeze it. Soft herbs, like parsley, cilantro and dill have to be slightly processed before being able to be frozen. Others, like sage and rosemary can be frozen just as is because they are more hearty. If you don’t see an herb on this list, such as mint, it’s because we do not recommend freezing.

The Best Way to Clean Herbs

Herbs can be very dirty and gritty, whether coming from the supermarket or the farmer’s market. The best way to clean herbs is to fill up a big bowl with clean, cool water. Dunk the herbs in the water, letting all the dirt and grit sink to the bottom a few times. Empty the water, fill it back up and repeat until no sand or dirt remains at the bottom of the bowl.

It is best to dry herbs in a salad spinner. If you do not have that you can let the herbs dry in a clean kitchen towel, taking off as much water as possible, especially if you are storing the herbs in oil.

containers for saving fresh herbs

Storing Whole Herbs

Some herbs are great candidates to store in the freezer whole. To prepare them for freezing follow the steps below. Most important you want to remove as much air as possible from the storage containers, so plastic bags are a good choice here for storing whole herbs. You can use a straw to suck as much air out of the bag as possible before closing. But we preferred using glass jars to store herbs that are best cut before freezing.

Rosemary: Wash and dry the leaves / stems very well. Place in a plastic bag with as much air removed as possible and store in the freezer for up to 6 months.

Thyme: Wash and dry the leaves / stems very well and then pick off the leaves. Sometimes picking off all of the leaves can be tedious and difficult if the stem is soft. It’s okay to have some bits of stem in there, so long as it is soft as this contains lots of flavor. You can chop it small if you want. However, make sure you discard any woody pieces of stem as they don’t taste good! Store in a plastic bag or airtight container in the freezer for up to 6 months.

Chives: Wash and dry and slice. Store in a airtight container or plastic bag or with as much air removed as possible and store in the freezer for up to 6 months.

Lemongrass: Wash and dry and remove the outer layer, then slice. Store in a airtight container or plastic bag or with as much air removed as possible and store in the freezer for up to 6 months.

pieces of fresh herbs preserved

Storing Chopped Soft Herbs in Water or Oil

Soft herbs cannot be stored whole without some processing in the freezer. The herbs are washed, chopped how you would like it to be used and then submerged in either oil, water or broth. Small portions can be stored in ice cube trays, small mason jars or bags. Freeze in small quantities so you can easily take out a small amount that you’ll need in a specific dish.

Oil preserves the herbs the best because it’s air tight and prevents discoloration, plus then the oil is infused with the herb flavor. BUT you won’t always need the oil in the recipes you’ll be using the fresh herbs for. You can alternatively use water or broth to store the herbs in.

Parsley: Wash and dry the parsley and pick off the leaves. Rough chop parsley and freeze in ice cube trays or other small containers and submerge with either water, broth or oil.

Cilantro: Wash and dry the cilantro and pick off the leaves. Rough chop cilantro and freeze in ice cube trays or other small containers and submerge with either water, broth or oil.

Basil: Wash and dry the basil and pick off the leaves. Rough chop basil and freeze in ice cube trays or other small containers and submerge with either water, broth or oil.

Sage: Wash and dry the sage and pick off the leaves. Rough chop sage and freeze in ice cube trays or other small containers and submerge with either water, broth or oil.

Sage pesto with spoon

Storing Pureed Herbs in the Freezer

Our favorite method for storing herbs is to make a simple puree with olive oil and storing in the freezer. Delicate herbs like basil, dill and cilantro are best preserved this way. We’ve included a recipe for a simple pesto below but really any combination of herbs with a touch of olive oil and some seasoning will brighten up any future dish. We recommend adding an extra splash of olive oil to the surface of the herbs to help preserve them longer, since oil creates an air tight seal. You could also use broth and stock as well.

When making a puree you do not always need to take all of the stem off. There is a lot of flavor in the stem so often times we will leave portions of the stem in and not be as careful with taking off individual leaves. This is only true though for soft herbs like basil, parsley, dill and cilantro. “Woody” stems from herbs like thyme, rosemary and sage are not edible.

Parsley: Clean the parsley. Pick the leaves from the stem or optionally leave some of stem in for more flavor.  Puree with oil or water and (optionally with additional flavoring) and make parsley pesto.

Cilantro: Clean the cilantro. Pick the leaves from the stem or optionally leave some of stem in for more flavor. Puree with oil or water and (optionally with additional flavoring) and make cilantro pesto.

Dill: Clean the dill. Pick the fronds from the stem or optionally leave some of stem in for more flavor. Puree with oil, water or broth.

Basil: Clean the basil. Pick the leaves from the stem or optionally leave some of stem in for more flavor. Puree with oil, water or broth or make a pesto.

Sage: Clean the sage Pick the leaves from the stem (do not puree with stem). Puree with oil, water or broth or make a pesto.

Ways to use preserved herbs:

  • in soups, stews or sauces
  • With pasta, rice
  • In a salad dressing
  • In egg dishes (omelet or quich)
  • As a sauce (think freezer pesto chicken)
  • As a spread on sandwiches, pizza
  • As a dip

Simple Pesto

Prep Time 00:05 Total Time 00:05 Yields 1 cup

Ingredients

  • 2 cups herbs
  • ⅓ cup nuts or seeds (pine nuts, almonds, pistachio, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds)
  • ⅓ cup grated Parmesan cheese (optional)
  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • salt and pepper, to taste

Directions

  1. In a food processor or blender, combine herbs and nuts and process until finely chopped.
  2. Add the Parmesan, if adding, and pulse again.
  3. With the motor running, drizzle in the olive oil and lemon juice.
  4. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. When storing, drizzle some extra olive oil on top of the pesto to create an air tight seal.
  6. Will keep in refrigerator about 1 week. Will keep in freezer about 3 months.
Loading nutrition data...
There may be affiliate links in this post! By clicking on them, or purchasing recommended items I may receive a small compensation, at no cost to you! However, I only recommend products I absolutely love and use in my own home! Thank you for supporting Lexi's Clean Kitchen when you shop! See my privacy policy for more information about this, the information we save, and more!

Pin it for later:

How to Preserve Fresh Herbs in the Freezer

How to Store Fresh Herbs in the Refrigerator

Fresh herbs can accumulate quickly in your refrigerator, whether you have a bunch of fresh herbs from the farmer’s market, your garden or the grocery store we are sharing tips on how to store them in your refrigerator so they remain fresh for as long as possible! If you are looking for how to preserve fresh herbs in your freezer, see this post!

how to store fresh herbs so they lastHow to Store Fresh Herbs So They Last

Using fresh herbs is a great way to brighten any dish and bring it from just ok to wow! But sometimes a little goes a long way with fresh herbs and you can be left with a whole lot leftover from one recipe. Or you have an overabundance of herbs from your summer CSA or your backyard garden and want to make them last as long as possible. We’re sharing all the ways we’ve succesfully stored fresh herbs in the refrigerator to get the maximum use out of them. If you are looking for ways to preserve fresh herbs in the freezer to last all year, check out this post here.

There are two main ways we recommend storing fresh herbs for maximum longevity in the refrigerator. But how you store them depends on what type of herb it is! Soft herbs, or herbs with a soft stem, such as cilantro, dill, parsley, basil should be stored liked fresh flowers, in a jar of water. Hard herbs, or herbs with a hard stem should be stored rolled in a slightly damn paper towel in a bag in the refrigerator.

Cutting the ends off herbs so they last longer

How to Store Soft Herbs: treat as flowers

Storing soft herbs in jars with water prolongs the life of the herbs by keeping them alive like flowers.

Pro-tip: Don’t wash these herbs until right before use.

To store parsley, cilantro or dill cut off 1” of the stems and place in a jar with water and store in the refrigerator. We found it unnecessary (and wasteful) to place a plastic bag over the top of the herbs as they stayed just as fresh without one. Check and replace water as necessary, or every few days. Store until the leaves start to turn yellow or very limp, about 2-4 weeks (seriously).

To store fresh basil: cut off 1” of the stems place in a jar with water and store at room temperature just like fresh flower. Refresh water as necessary, or every few days. Store for about 1 week or until the basil has turned soft and limp. Please note: this only works with very fresh basil cut from a garden or the farmers market. The boxes of basil that you buy in the store is typically grown in green houses and are not hearty enough to be stored for longevity. Store bought green house basil must be used within a few days before it starts to go bad.

How to Store Hard Herbs: prolong moisture content

Storing hard herbs in damp paper towels prolongs their moisture levels and keeps them fresher, longer. You’ll notice there is one herb included in here that is not technically a hard herb: chives. Chives last the longest when they are frozen, see this post, but they can have a longer shelf life in the refrigerator when stored the same way as hard herbs.

To store sage, thyme, rosemary, mint, or chives:  Clean and dry the herbs very well (see below for cleaning tips). Place in a pile in a slightly damp paper towel and wrap them up. Place inside of a plastic bag with a few punctured holes. Keep in the refrigerator about 1-2 weeks or more. 

Best ways to store fresh herbs

The Best Way to Clean Herbs

Herbs can be very dirty and gritty, whether coming from the supermarket or the farmer’s market. The best way to clean herbs is to fill up a big bowl with clean, cool water. Dunk the herbs in the water, letting all the dirt and grit sink to the bottom a few times. Empty the water, fill it back up and repeat until no sand or dirt remains at the bottom of the bowl.

It is best to dry herbs in a salad spinner. If you do not have that you can let the herbs dry in a clean kitchen towel, taking off as much water as possible.

Rolling up herbs so they last the longest

Recipes that feature herbs:

Pin it for later:

How to Store Fresh Herbs in the Fridge

Easy Dill Pickles (Plus Everything To Know For Canning!)

Have you ever wondered how to make easy Dill Pickles at home? With the abundance of cucumbers and fresh dill at the farmer’s markets and CSA’s, let’s do something other than tomato cucumber salads, shall we? I love this recipe because it’s EASY to make. We are going to walk you through the canning process too so you don’t have to feel intimidated to process and make your own pickles this season!

Canning Dill Pickles

Easy Dill Pickles

Pickles are the best! Especially pickles made from the abundance of in-season cucumbers found at the end of the summer. We want to share with you an easy recipe to make dill pickles that you can either process in mason jars to preserve the taste of summer all year long, or to quickly put up in the refrigerator to use up your cucumber supply now!

What type of cucumber is best for pickling?

Either way, let’s start with the basics: what kind of pickle should you use? Definitely always start with the best possible produce you can find when you want to preserve something. Let’s face it, if you preserve a mediocre vegetable in some vinegar, it isn’t suddenly going to turn in to a better vegetable just because you place it in vinegar.

So for our dill pickles you want to source out small and freshly-picked cucumbers that are not bruised or damaged in any way. We like the smaller and younger cucumbers because they stay crunchier than the more mature large cucumbers that have larger seeds and softer flesh.

How to Make Dill Pickles

How do I make cucumber pickles?

Once you have found the best cucumbers, you can decide whether you want to preserve the cucumber in canning jars using a boiling water canning method, or you can make refrigerator pickles. If processed properly, canned pickles are shelf stable, unopened, for about a year. Refrigerator pickles will keep for 3 months in your refrigerator. We’ve included instructions for both in the recipe. It’s slightly more complicated to process using a boiling water canning method but we’ve got you covered with some tips below.

Canning 101: 

Canning is simply the process of preserving food in jars to become shelf stable. To do this you need to use clean and intact jars and submerge them in a boiling water bath for a specified period of time. This process eliminates any oxygen from the jars making the food shelf stable. However, this lack of oxygen could create a dangerous environment for the growth of a bacteria called botulism. This is super rare and can be prevented by following a few basic rules to assure you are canning safely. Once of the most important aspects of canning is to make sure that your food has a high level of acid. If the food isn’t naturally high in acid, like say cucumbers, you need to create a pickle liquid that is high in acid, like one that is made up of vinegar, to assure that nothing dangerous can grow in your processed jars. Below are some tips to help you safely process your pickles:

  1. Follow the recipe. Whether it is our recipe, or a recipe from another reputable source, follow it to assure you are using the correct amount of vinegar to water.
  2. Follow the instructions: Take care to follow specific instructions when a recipe tells you to leave a certain amount of headspace or not to disturb the canning jars after they’ve been processed. They all play a roll in making sure the lid seals properly.
  3. Check to make sure that the lid has sealed after going through the canning process by pressing down in the center of the lid. If it doesn’t move when you press down on it, it has likely sealed. To take it one step further, remove the band and try to remove the lid. If it doesn’t come off easily your jar has sealed properly. You can store the jars with or without the bands on.
  4. For additional information on canning safety and procedures check out The National Center for Home Food Preservation.

How to Make Quick Dill Pickles

What equipment do you need to can?

While they sell many kits and specialized pieces of equipment to can, you really need just a few basic things to start. If you feel like you are going to process a lot of fruits and vegetables, it might make sense to invest in them, but if you are just starting out begin with this small list:

  1. A large pot that will leave fit a pint sized jar (on a rack) with 1-2 inches of space above it for the water to boil.
  2. A rack that can rest in the bottom of the pot to prevent the jars from cracking while they are being processed.
  3. Mason jars that are made for canning, such as Ball or Kerr jars. We prefer pints because they require a shorter processing time, so tend to make crisper pickles.
  4. Brand new lidsYou cannot reuse old lids when you are canning.
  5. Bands. They can be new or old, but just make sure they are not rusting.
  6. Tongs or a utensil to safely remove hot jars from hot water. They make jar lifters that do come in handy, but we made do without one.
  7. A funnel to easily pour pickle liquid into the jars. We also made do without this, but it can make it easier.

Canning Cucumbers to Make Quick Dill Pickles

How long do you have to boil jars for canning?

Each recipe should give you a specific instruction on how long to process each jar. It depends on what you are processing. For our recipe we are processing pints, so we recommend to process for 15 minutes in boiling water, and then let sit for 5 more minutes before removing to rest for 12-24 hours because checking the seal.

How do you sterilize canning jars?

You can clean jars, lids and bands in warm soapy water and then place in water to boil for 5 minutes. The lids and bands do not have to be warm when beginning the process of canning, but the jars do, so if it’s best to leave them at a temperate of at least 180ºF after sanitizing. The jars need to be warm to prevent them from breaking when your pour in the hot pickling liquid. Another method to sterilize the jars and bring them to temperature is to put them through a sanitizing cycle in the dishwasher right before you are to begin the process.

Easy Dill Pickles

A beginner’s Guide to Canning

Food canning can seem daunting since there’s a little science that happens, but it is actually easy and can be great for those who have a garden or an abundance of food to use up (especially in the Summer), since you can preserve it and store it for winter when things aren’t as in season! When you properly can foods, the container will be airtight to prevent spoilage (you want that pop at the end)! Depending on the type of food, you can keep it stored for differing lengths of time, typically about a year! Canning is just so cool.

How to Make Dill Pickles

Have cucumbers but don’t want to make pickles? Try these cucumber recipes that we love:

 

Easy Dill Pickles

Easy Dill Pickles

Total Time 0:00 Yields 3 pints

Ingredients

  • 2 cups white vinegar
  • 2 cups water
  • 3 tablespoons pickling / kosher salt / fine sea salt (see note)
  • 6 garlic cloves
  • 6 sprigs fresh dill
  • 1-1/2 pounds pickling cucumbers, washed and dried
  • pinch red pepper flakes

Directions

To Make Refrigerator Dill Pickles:

  1. Begin with clean and dry mason jars. Place on a towel on the counter.
  2. In a medium sauce pan bring vinegar, water and salt to a boil.
  3. Meanwhile prepare cucumbers: Slice off the top and the bottom so that they fit into the pint jar with 1/2" of space below the top of the jar. Then slice in to spears.
  4. In each jar pack 2 cloves garlic, 2 sprigs dill, and as many cucumbers that will fit. 
  5. Once the pickling brine has boiled, carefully pour the hot brine into the jars. Let cool cool to room temperature uncovered.
  6. Once cooled, cover and place in refrigerator for up to 3 months. Pickles can be enjoyed the next day, but for best flavor let it sit at least 1 week.

To Preserve Dill Pickles in Canning Jars:

  1. Begin by washing with warm soapy water 3 Ball or Kerr mason jars and BRAND NEW LIDS and seals. Inspect the jars to make sure there are no cracks or fissures anywhere
  2. Fill a large pot that is fitted with a rack with water. Make sure the pot is big enough to have water cover the pint jars on rack by 1-2 inches. Place clean jars inside of water and bring to a boil to sanitize. If using any other equipment like tongs or a funnel you can sanitize in water at this point too. Once boiled, let water sit to at least 180º until you are ready to can. An alternative method is to place all jars, lids and utensils in a dishwasher and start the canning process right before the dishwasher has finished so that by the time you are ready to can the jars are ready as well.
  3. In a medium sauce pan bring vinegar, water and salt to a boil.
  4. Meanwhile prepare cucumbers: Slice off the top and the bottom so that they fit into the pint jar with 1/2" of space below the top of the jar. Then slice in to spears.
  5. Carefully remove hot jars from canning pot (or dishwasher) and place on a clean kitchen towel on the counter.
  6. In each jar pack 2 cloves garlic, 2 sprigs dill, and as many cucumbers that will fit, taking care to leave 1/2" of headspace.
  7. Once the pickling bring has boiled, carefully pour the hot brine into the jars.
  8. Place lid in the center of the packed jar and then place on band and tighten. Repeat with remaining jars.
  9. Return packed cans to the canning pot and make sure water covers the jars by at least 1-2 inches. Bring to a boil and process for 15 minutes.
  10. Let cool for 5 minutes before removing from pot and placing on a clean kitchen towel. Leave undisturbed for 12-24 hours. At some point during this time you may hear a pop, when the jar has fully sealed.
  11. After 24 hours check to make sure they have been processed correctly by pressing down on the center of the lid. It should not move at all. Additionally you can remove the band and try to gently open the lid. If it doesn't open easily it has sealed correctly. If for any reason it has not sealed correctly immediately place in the refrigerator and consume within 3 months. Properly processed pickles can keep unopened at room temperature for 1 year.

Recipe Notes

  1. If you are new to canning and pickling, read through the entire body of the post for additional information.
  2. It's important to use a salt here that does not have an anti-caking agent added to it. Use a salt that is labeled for pickling, kosher salt without any additives or a natural sea salt with fine granules.
Loading nutrition data...
There may be affiliate links in this post! By clicking on them, or purchasing recommended items I may receive a small compensation, at no cost to you! However, I only recommend products I absolutely love and use in my own home! Thank you for supporting Lexi's Clean Kitchen when you shop! See my privacy policy for more information about this, the information we save, and more!

Have you tried canning?!

Apple Dill Chicken Salad

Apple Dill Chicken Salad [low-carb, dairy-free, paleo-friendly]| Lexi's Clean Kitchen

This Apple Dill Chicken salad is the perfect low-carb make ahead Fall lunch! Inspired by a local cafe who makes a similar chicken salad, I simply can’t get enough of it!

Apple Dill Chicken Salad [low-carb, dairy-free, paleo-friendly]| Lexi's Clean Kitchen

What a fun-filled weekend I had!

Mike, his family, and I headed to Toronto on Saturday for Mike’s cousin’s wedding. I had never been to Toronto before and I had a great time meeting new people, exploring the city, and getting to know the Canadian lifestyle.

Apple Dill Chicken Salad [low-carb, dairy-free, paleo-friendly]| Lexi's Clean Kitchen

A definite highlight of my weekend trip was getting to meet my girl Davida from over at The Healthy Maven.

food blogger meet up

If you haven’t been over to her blog yet, I suggest you head over there; I love her blog and absolutely love her! And a small world it is! It turns out Mike and Davida went camp together when they were kids.

 

We met, we talked, and it felt just like a bunch of old friends hanging out. I can’t wait for our next Toronto trip (over the Summer) when we can spend more time together!

Apple Dill Chicken Salad [low-carb, dairy-free, paleo-friendly]| Lexi's Clean Kitchen

Now that we are home and are getting settled for the work week, I wanted a lunch that was quick, easy, and light (since our weekend was anything but) and this was just what I needed.

10 minutes to toss together, one-bowl for minimal cleanup, and loaded with delicious Fall flavors = the perfect lunch for busy work weeks!

Apple Dill Chicken Salad [low-carb, dairy-free, paleo-friendly]| Lexi's Clean Kitchen

Watch the video:

 

Apple Dill Chicken Salad

Prep Time 00:10 Cook Time 00:00 Total Time 0:10 Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 2 cups cooked chicken, shredded
  • 1/3 cup organic mayonnaise (homemade or store-bought), add more as needed
  • 2 organic apples, finely diced
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon dried dill, more to taste
  • 1/2 red onion, finely diced
  • 2 teaspoon coconut sugar

Directions

  1. Cook Chicken: How To: All-Purpose Shredded Crock Pot Chicken
  2. Allow chicken to cool and transfer 2 cups to a large mixing bowl.
  3. Add mayonnaise, apples, dill, and red onion to the large mixing bowl.
  4. Mix well to combine. Taste and adjust ingredients as needed.
  5. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to one week.

Recipe Notes

  • I start with a tablespoon of mayonnaise and add until I reach my desired amount
Loading nutrition data...
There may be affiliate links in this post! By clicking on them, or purchasing recommended items I may receive a small compensation, at no cost to you! However, I only recommend products I absolutely love and use in my own home! Thank you for supporting Lexi's Clean Kitchen when you shop! See my privacy policy for more information about this, the information we save, and more!